Sunday, October 17, 2010

One Nation Under Fraud, Bank Foreclosures!

Joseph Tauke - The Daily Caller Published: 4:08 AM 10/14/2010 Updated: 3:07 PM 10/15/2010


Tomorrow, a bank—not your bank, but any bank—could evict you from your home. Even if you didn’t know the bank was foreclosing. Even if your mortgage is paid off. Even if you never had a mortgage to begin with. Even if the bank doesn’t hold a single piece of paper that you signed. And major banks not only know this fact, but have spent millions of dollars to defend it in court. Why? The answer starts with a Jacksonville homeowner named Patrick Jeffs.

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2010/10/14/thedc-op-ed-one-nation-under-fraud/#ixzz12dN5xyUz

In 2007, Deutsche Bank sued Jeffs for his home, which is a necessary step in the process of foreclosing on a homeowner in the state of Florida. Curiously, despite the fact that he immediately hired a law firm to defend his property when he found out about the foreclosure, neither Jeffs nor his attorneys were at the trial. That’s because it had already happened. Deutsche won by default because Jeffs wasn’t able to travel backwards in time to attend, even though the trial featured a signed affidavit indicating that he had been served his court summons.

The only problem with the summons Jeffs supposedly received was that it had been conjured out of thin air.

In June of this year, a Florida court ruled that the document was fraudulent, as the person who was supposed to make sure Jeffs was served had mysteriously received a copy of the summons before the lawsuit had even been filed, and Jeffs never even saw the copy. The text of that ruling was posted on various financial news websites in September. The lawyers that Jeffs hired to defend his case say that fraud such as this is not uncommon. It’s a widespread problem, and it has cost countless families their homes.

“I think it’s safe to say that 95% of the foreclosure cases in Florida involve some form of fraud on the part of the bank,” David Goldman of Apple Law Firm, PLLC told The Daily Caller in a phone interview. “It’s probably closer to 99%. And the court system is helping them get away with it.”

A 95% rate of fraud sounds preposterous, but the number was repeated by a paralegal familiar with the case, Lisa Beasley, as well as Michael Redman, who was prompted to create a website called 4closurefraud.org after enduring personal experiences with the matter. There’s a reason for them to say so—they take and report on a lot of foreclosure fraud cases—but there’s also a reason they devote so much of their time to these cases, just like there’s a reason that multiple states are suing major banks for the same type of fraud.

The Sunshine State has something called the “Sunshine Law,” which states that unless very specific conditions, such as the need to protect a witness, are met by a trial, it must be open to the public. But over the past several months, Goldman says that attempts to observe foreclosure proceedings have been met with bailiffs and locked doors. Then, banks successfully argue that because they own the paperwork behind mortgages and don’t want anyone who doesn’t have to see those titles to see them, the public doesn’t have the right to ask for them as part of an examination of court records.

Representatives of Deutsche Bank told The Daily Caller via email that the bank’s involvement in the Jeffs case was merely nominal, as it had to be named as the plaintiff in the case because it ultimately held the right to foreclose, not Chase, which originally made the loan and which was accepting Jeffs’ payments and forwarding them to the proper recipients. But Chase had tried to work out a loan modification with Jeffs, and he was current on his payments when Chase abruptly informed him that his modification was denied without explanation. Several days later, Jeffs found out that he supposedly no longer owned his home. He stopped making payments, and he hasn’t made them since. But no bank has been able to successfully repossess and sell the property. To the banking system, the asset backed by the house—the mortgage—has simply vanished into thin air.

Does that mean that Jeffs is finally in the clear? Not exactly. “Quite often, what happens in these cases is the bank creates new documents to fix the old documents,” said Goldman. “One of the most common things we see is a paper with a notary stamp that gives the bank the legal authority to foreclose. Well, anyone can buy those stamps. I can buy those stamps. A lot of what’s going on is law firms desperate to win a case are hired by banks who don’t know what those law firms are up to. Then the bank thinks it can foreclose, even though other banks also think they have that right, and those banks might not figure out what happened for a long time because the system is absolutely overloaded with foreclosures. And even if they do figure it out, suing to repossess a property that another bank already sold is a long and arduous process. So you wind up with a scenario in which the left hand doesn’t know what the right hand is doing.”

The “right hand” took three years to figure out the Jeffs case. Meanwhile, the fraud continues. Earlier this year, Goldman worked with Jane Doe, an elderly woman whose real name couldn’t be disclosed for legal reasons. She had just spent several weeks outside of her home state of Florida visiting relatives, and she was current on her mortgage payments, which she had been paying for the past 15 years. She even called up her bank during her trip to ask about the best way to send in her latest payment. The bank told her that it wasn’t allowed to discuss the mortgage with her because her husband was the property owner, not her. But the bank couldn’t discuss the mortgage with her husband, either. Why? Because he was dead. And he had been for five years. Confirming this fact would have taken mere minutes.

Instead, when Jane returned home, the locks to her house had been changed and all of the property inside the house was gone. She still hasn’t recovered that property, and the bank hasn’t even told her where it is. According to Goldman, the wrongful repossession was first admitted, and then, inexplicably, the bank actually changed its mind and tried to make the outrageous claim that the homeowners’ association was actually the entity which had ultimately decided to change the locks and empty the house.

Stories like these are what prompted a class-action lawsuit against lenders in southern Florida, with Deutsche Bank being listed as one of the defendants. Unfortunately, the problem isn’t limited to Florida. California’s attorney general recently filed his own class-action lawsuit on behalf of all of his state’s homeowners


regarding the use of fraudulent documents to foreclose. Ohio’s attorney general has announced that he will be prosecuting every single case of foreclosure fraud committed by Ally Bank, formerly known as GMAC, with an individual lawsuit. Each suit would carry with it a fine of up to $25,000 on top of the cost of repairing the damages caused by the erroneous foreclosure. Arizona’s attorney general has sent letters to more than 60 banks informing them that foreclosing on any homeowners with erroneous documents will be considered criminal fraud.


Things are particularly bad in states like Arizona because of a peculiarity of their respective state foreclosure laws. Banks don’t have to go to court to foreclose on a property in those states. Instead, they can simply show “proof” of rightful foreclosure to local officials, who then evict the homeowners. To fight back against fraud, the homeowners have to hire a lawyer—which many can’t afford to do—and win a lawsuit before the property is sold.

“A lot of this stuff gets by everyone,” said Kevin Harper of Harper Law PLC, which operates in Arizona. “State law says that if a bank makes a mistake when they foreclose and sell, they only have to pay for damages incurred by the rightful owners. And since so many homes are underwater, the banks often argue that the owners haven’t suffered any damage whatsoever. Even if there was rampant fraud, there really would be no way to stop it in Arizona. So many of these cases involve mortgages that have repeatedly been bought and sold, and what you get is some guy in a bank checking off boxes for a foreclosure without knowing why. The left hand doesn’t know what the right hand is doing.”

No, that’s not a typo. Both Goldman and Harper used the exact same cliché to describe what the American financial system, the one taxpayers “needed” to pay untold billions to save, has become. Two hands without a brain, not even aware of the reasons they had to be bailed out. This was best highlighted by an event that generated plenty of late-night chuckles last fall, when Wells Fargo sued … Wells Fargo.

Wells Fargo wanted to foreclose on a condo unit which had multiple mortgages attached to it. Wells Fargo also owned one of those second mortgages. So Wells Fargo spent money to hire a law firm and file suit against the irresponsible lenders at Wells Fargo. Then, Wells Fargo spent money to hire a different law firm in an understandable effort to defend Wells Fargo from the vicious legal attack coming from Wells Fargo. The second law firm even prepared a legal statement for Wells Fargo which called into question the dubious claims being made by Wells Fargo. Sadly, Wells Fargo won the case, crushing the hopes of Wells Fargo.

As business reporter Al Lewis wrote at the time, “You can’t expect a bank that is dumb enough to sue itself to know why it is suing itself.” So goes the unprecedented wave of foreclosures that has swept across the country since the housing bubble popped. Mortgages have been bought, sold, and repackaged so many times through such an opaque process that banks have no idea who owns what. When they foreclose, they simply guess, making up the documents and information necessary to do so.

That’s how Bank of America could foreclose on homeowners who paid for their property in cash up front—repeatedly. Earlier in the year, Bank of America “foreclosed” on Charlie and Maria Cardoso, removing all of their property and changing the locks even as a realtor employed by the bank itself told it that there was no mortgage on which the Cardosos could skip payments. Eventually, the papers used by Bank of America were shown to have the wrong address. Someone, somewhere guessed. And Bank of America didn’t learn from its mistake.

Plenty more to read on the story by clicking the link below:

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2010/10/14/thedc-op-ed-one-nation-under-fraud/2/#ixzz12dKOcKxV